June

With May experiencing some of this year’s hottest days of the year, you will have no doubt been enjoying your garden, as well as working hard on it! I am sure that all your hard work will be worth it!

Flowers
Bedding plants - If you've grown your own bedding see that you water them well before you plant them out. Add a good slow release fertilizer around the plants which will help to feed them all summer if you forget to liquid feed.

Spring Bulbs - Remove foliage from spring bulbs after it turns yellow and begins to dry. Set out bedding plants to cover the bare spots using care not to damage the bulbs.

Roses - Watch for and control blackspot and powdery mildew on rose foliage. Use bark mulch around young trees to protect them from lawn mower damage.
 
Flowering Shrubs - Spring flowering shrubs such as spirea, viburnum, lilac and forsythia should be pruned as soon as they are done blooming. Mid to late June is an excellent time to take softwood cuttings of shrubs to start new plants. Some shrubs which can be propagated in this way are spirea, lilac and viburnum.

Nursary Plants - When you buy nursery stock that is container grown, check the root ball and make sure it is not bound too tightly. A mass of circling roots will stay that way even after it is planted in the ground. If you do not have much room to landscape, consider using some of the many dwarf varieties available. These are plants that have slow growth and stay small, so there is little pruning maintenance. There are numerous dwarf evergreens, flowering trees and shrubs from which to choose.

Bedding plants - If you've grown your own bedding see that you water them well before you plant them out. Add a good slow release fertilizer around the plants which will help to feed them all summer if you forget to liquid feed.

Rhododendrons and Azaleas - Now your rhododendrons and azaleas have nearly finished flowering the dead flowers try to form a seed. Remove the seed heads as this will allow the new shoots to grow.
Feed with Miracid to keep the acid levels up and see that plants don't dry out through the summer as this would effect next year's flower bud formation.

Roses - Roses start to come into flower now and it's important to feed with a good granular fertilizer. This will enrich the flower color and help protect those roses from diseases. A well fed flower is a lot stronger.  Spray if you see Blackspot with Rose Clear Ready to Use and then follow up with Multirose or similar to keep them clear all summer long.

Cuttings - Do you fancy taking a few cuttings of plants for next year to give a fresh supply of pinks, violas and pansies? To take them you need a 4" pot and good gritty compost. The cuttings need to be about 2" long and remove any bottom leaves or growth. A hormone rooting liquid or gel will improve results and just pop them into the moist compost. Pop a polythene bag over the pot with a small stick to hold it up and you've created your own little propagator.

Bedding Flowers - Remove old flower heads from annual bedding plants to keep them blooming. Disbud chrysanthemum flowers to secure large, beautiful blooms on straight, strong stems. To disbud, remove the small side buds along the stems which form in the angles of the leaves. This will allow all of the food reserves to be used for one large flower rather than many smaller ones.

Rhododendrons and Azaleas - Now your rhododendrons and azaleas have nearly finished flowering the dead flowers try to form a seed. Remove the seed heads as this will allow the new shoots to grow.
Feed with Miracid to keep the acid levels up and see that plants don't dry out through the summer as this would effect next year's flower bud formation.

Roses - Roses start to come into flower now and it's important to feed with a good granular fertilizer. This will enrich the flower colour and help protect those roses from diseases. A well fed flower is a lot stronger.  Spray if you see Blackspot with Rose Clear Ready to Use and then follow up with Multirose or similar to keep them clear all summer long.

Cuttings - Do you fancy taking a few cuttings of plants for next year to give a fresh supply of pinks, violas and pansies? To take them you need a 4" pot and good gritty compost. The cuttings need to be about 2" long and remove any bottom leaves or growth. A hormone rooting liquid or gel will improve results and just pop them into the moist compost. Pop a polythene bag over the pot with a small stick to hold it up and you've created your own little propagator.


Fruit, Vegetables and Herbs
Watering
- After your vegetable garden is well established, it is best to water it thoroughly once a week rather than giving it a light watering everyday. That way, a deeper root system is encouraged to develop, which will later help the plants tolerate dry weather. Keep a close eye on the quality of your spring crops.
 
Lettuce
- Hot weather causes lettuce to bolt and become bitter. Plant a warm season crop as soon as the spring vegetables are harvested.

Blossom-end - In most cases, blossom-end rot on tomatoes, peppers, squash and watermelons can be prevented. This can be done through maintaining a uniform soil moisture by mulching and watering correctly, planting in well drained soil and not cultivating deeper than one inch within one foot of the plant. Also avoid the use of high nitrogen fertilizers. Continue planting warm season vegetable crops such as beans, squash and cucumbers.

Herbs - The best time to harvest most herbs is just before flowering, when the leaves contain the maximum essential oils.

Strawberries - We'll finish off with strawberries as it reminds me of summer and having them dipped in sugar just like the Queen has hers. As the fruits form they need plenty of water if it's a dry spell, especially if you are growing them in towers. Feed with a high pot ash food like tomato food and watch for slugs and birds. The latter can be deterred by nets, but do check daily to see no young birds are caught in it. Last, but not least Enjoy your Garden.


Other
Lawnmowers
- Before pouring gasoline into the fuel tank of your lawn mower, garden tiller or other garden equipment, be sure to turn off the engine and allow it to cool for at least five minutes.

Garden Pests - Identify garden pests before you attempt to control them. If you decide to use chemical control, read the label carefully. Bats can be an effective way to control insects. One big brown bat can eat 3,000 to 7,000 insects each night. Attract bats by building and placing bat houses in your yard. Leftover vegetable and flower seeds may be stored in a cool dry location to be saved for planting next year.

Droughts - Start a gardening notebook. Pay special attention to those plants which withstand drought conditions. During the hot summer months, mulch can be especially useful for conserving water.

For vegetable gardens, shredded leaves or grass clippings are good mulch material. For ornamentals, pine needles or wood bark do the best job. Weed removal is important for a number of reasons. It conserves moisture, conserves nutrients in the soil and helps prevent the spread of disease and insects.

For hanging baskets in cool, shady locations, use tuberous begonias, ferns, impatiens or fibrous rooted begonias in combination with trailing plants, such as English ivy.


Handy Tips for the lawn in June:
Begin regular cutting of your lawn. If the grass is long – increase the height adjustment of the mower to the highest setting once this first cut has been done, go back over the lawn and cut it again on a lower setting.

During this month your lawn may need cutting twice a week and will need watering regularly too. Be sure not to water your lawn when the sun is at its highest in the sky (as this could cause the lawn to burn).

Continue to cut the grass weekly and give it a feed if necessary, depending on the weather and how healthy the lawn is. Cutting weekly will keep the grass thick, green and free of weeds.

 Plants at their best ... We recommend Sowing ... It's a great time to Harvest... It's a good time to Harvest...

Achillea
Agastache
Alcemilla Mollis
Bergamot
Borage
Bugle
Catmint
Clary
Delphiniums
Foxgloves
Gladiolus
Geraniums
Harebells
Hollyhock
Hostas
Hyssop
Irises
Lavender
Lilies
Lupins
Mallows
Purple Mullien
Pinks
Nasturtiums
Purple Toadflax
Roses
Salvias
Sweet Rocket
Sweet Williams,
Thalictrium
Aquilegia
Folium,
Valfriana Officinal’s
Verbascums

Beetroots
Broccoli & Calabrese
Cabbages
Celeriac & Kohl Rabi
Chard
Courgettes, Marrows & Squashes
Fennel
French Beans
Lettuces
Onions & Shallots
Peas, Mange touts & Sugar Snaps
Runner beans
Salad Leaves
Spinach
Sweet corn
Turnips & Swedes

Aubergines
Peppers
Chillies
Broccoli & Calabrese
Brussels sprouts
Kale
Cabbages
Cauliflowers
Celeriac & Kohl Rabi
Celery
Chard
Courgettes, Marrows & Squashes
Cucumber
Fennel
French Beans
Leeks
Lettuces
Pumpkins
Runner Beans
Salad Leaves
Spinach
Sweet corn
Tomatoes

Beetroots
Broad beans
Broccoli & Calabrese
Cabbages
Carrots
Cauliflowers
Celeriac & Kohl Rabi
Chard
Courgettes, Marrow & Squashes
Cucumbers
French Beans
Lettuces
Onions & Shallots
Peas, Mange Touts & Sugar Snaps
Potatoes
Salad Leaves
Spinach
Tomatoes
Turnips & Swedes